The scam of dolphin-assisted therapy

Image by Eric Schwartzman via Flickr

The first in the list of “50 things to do before you die” as nominated by BBC TV viewers, is swimming with a dolphin. Regardless of the many psychological explanations that may be summoned to account for this oddity of human behaviour, the simple truth is that . . . → Read More: The scam of dolphin-assisted therapy

Sitting blissfully on a deep-sea time bomb

If you thought that the environmental damage from the infamous Deepwater Horizon oilrig was bad – with its discharge of almost 5 million barrels into the Gulf of Mexico during the past few months – consider that during the coming decade up to 20 times that amount of oil will start leaking into the . . . → Read More: Sitting blissfully on a deep-sea time bomb

Dolphin captivity attempts risk metastasizing the Egyptian Red Sea coast

Three days ago colleagues working with HEPCA, an environmental NGO very active in the field of marine conservation in the Red Sea, discovered a small pool hidden in a private courtyard in Hurghada where four bottlenose dolphins (apparently imported from Japan) are being kept in appalling conditions.  The dolphins were parked there in quarantine, . . . → Read More: Dolphin captivity attempts risk metastasizing the Egyptian Red Sea coast

Why commercial whaling must end

The time of whale hunting is up. Whaling belongs to a phase of human history that has no place on this planet anymore.

Whaling is cruel because it takes too long and too much suffering for a whale to die under the harpoon.

Whaling is dangerous because all whales – even those . . . → Read More: Why commercial whaling must end

Deepwater Horizon: a nightmare ends … or does it?

(translated and adapted from an article that I wrote in Italian, recently appeared on La Rivista della Natura)

With enormous relief a few days ago the world has learned– at least this is what we were told – that the gushing of crude from the Macondo well into the Gulf of Mexico has been . . . → Read More: Deepwater Horizon: a nightmare ends … or does it?

The world’s two remaining monk seal species: how many different ways are there of being Critically Endangered?

(This article appeared on The Monachus Guardian, Vol. 13(1), June 2010)

“Critically endangered” is the IUCN Red List category reserved for species facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the wild: to be exact, a probability of extinction of at least 50% within three generations, if quantitative analysis is applicable. This definition fits . . . → Read More: The world’s two remaining monk seal species: how many different ways are there of being Critically Endangered?

Why “Wave Action” – a concept framework

This post marks the beginning of my blog, Wave Action: a blog on things having to do with the survival of our seas and oceans. There are countless sites on this subject on the Internet, but this doesn’t deter me from adding my voice to the chorus. I have been engaged in activities dealing . . . → Read More: Why “Wave Action” – a concept framework